Indigenous Nationhood: Empowering Grassroots Citizens

Category: Book
By (author): Palmater, Pamela
Foreword By: Sinclair, Niigaanwewidam James
Subject:  POLITICAL SCIENCE / World / Canadian
  SOCIAL SCIENCE / Indigenous Studies
Publisher: Fernwood Publishing
Published: October 2015
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 320
Size: 9.00in x 6.00in x 0.00in
Our Price:
$ 19.95
Availability:
In stock

Additional Notes

From The Publisher*

Indigenous Nationhood is a selection of blog posts by well-known lawyer, activist and academic Pamela Palmater. Palmater offers critical legal and political commentary and analysis on legislation, Aboriginal rights, Canadian politics, First Nations politics and social issues such as murdered and missing Indigenous women, poverty, economics, identity and culture. Palmater?s writing tackles myths and stereotypes about Indigenous peoples head-on, discusses Indigenous nationhood and nation building, examines treaty rights and provides an accessible, critical analysis of laws and government policies being imposed on Indigenous peoples.

Fiercely anti-racist and anti-colonial, this book is intended to help rebuild the connections between Indigenous citizens and their home communities, local governments and Indigenous Nations for the benefit of future generations.

From The Publisher*

?Palmater?s blogs provide a glimpse of the deep complexities we face as indigenous peoples living in a colonial Canada. Her words are the articulation of this generation?s frustration with Canadian colonial policy.? ? Derek Nepinak, Grand Chief, Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs

Review Quote*

?Like the tools that our ancestors used for survival, Palmater?s words are sharp like a knife.?

Review Quote*

?Through Palmater?s relentless pursuit for justice and improved quality of life, she will undoubtedly set a new era for positive change for this country.?

Review Quote*

?Palmater?s blogs provide a glimpse of the deep complexities we face as indigenous peoples living in a colonial Canada. Her words are the articulation of this generation?s frustration with Canadian colonial policy.?