Freedom, Nature, and World

Category: Book
By (author): Loptson, Peter
Series: Philosophica
Subject:  PHILOSOPHY / Free Will & Determinism
  PHILOSOPHY / General
  PHILOSOPHY / History & Surveys / General
  PHILOSOPHY / Metaphysics
Audience: professional and scholarly
Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
Published: January 2008
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 344
Size: 8.00in x 5.00in x 1.00in
Availability:
Unavailable

Additional Notes

From The Publisher*Freedom, Nature, and World is a collection of essays by Peter Loptson which examine issues posed by a broadly naturalistic view of the world, which Loptson defends while also exploring some of the challenges it confronts. Papers on freedom, Kant, Christianity, Homer, the history of analytic philosophy, the place of humanity in nature, and other topics, are brought together within a synoptically naturalistic purview. All the essays rest on, and in some cases extend, that synoptic perspective, which seeks to encompass both a scientific understanding of humankind in the natural world and the complexities of free rational agency within our cultural and historical settings.
From The Publisher*

In these essays philosopher Peter Lopston expresses a broadly naturalist philosophical view, which seeks to integrate both a scientific understanding of humankind in the natural world and the complexities of free rational agency.

From The Publisher*

This volume is a collection of essays chiefly in philosophy, with a few others on philosophical topics in classics. The book specially focuses on issues posed by a broadly naturalistic view of the world, which the author defends while also exploring some of the challenges it confronts. Papers on freedom, Kant, Christianity, Homer, the history of analytic philosophy, the place of humanity in nature, and other topics, are brought together within a synoptically naturalistic purview. All the essays rest on, and in some cases extend, that synoptic perspective, which seeks to encompass both a scientific understanding of humankind in the natural world and the complexities of free rational agency within our cultural and historical settings.

Biographical NotePeter Loptson is a professor of philosophy at the University of Guelph.