The Right To Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet

Category: Book
By (author): Watt-Cloutier, Sheila
Subject:  BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Native Americans
  BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Political
  NATURE / Ecosystems & Habitats / Polar Regions
  SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
Publisher: Penguin Canada
Published: March 2016
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 368
Size: 8.25in x 5.25in
Our Price:
$ 22.00
Availability:
In stock

Additional Notes

From The Publisher*Now in paperback, one of Canada's most passionate environmental and human rights activists addresses the global threat of climate change from the intimate perspective of her own Arctic childhood

The Arctic ice is receding each year, but just as irreplaceable is the culture, the wisdom that has allowed the Inuit to thrive in the Far North for so long. And it's not just the Arctic. The whole world is changing in dangerous, unpredictable ways. Sheila Watt-Cloutier has devoted her life to protecting what is threatened and nurturing what has been wounded. In this culmination of Watt-Cloutier's regional, national, and international work over the last twenty-five years, The Right to Be Cold explores the parallels between safeguarding the Arctic and the survival of Inuit culture, of which her own background is such an extraordinary example. This is a human story of resilience, commitment, and survival told from the unique vantage point of an Inuk woman who, in spite of many obstacles, rose from humble beginnings in the Arctic to become one of the most influential and decorated environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world.
Biographical Note SHEILA WATT-CLOUTIER is one of the world's most recognized environmental and human rights activists. Experienced in working with global decision makers for over a decade, Watt-Cloutier offers a new model for twenty-first-century leadership. She treats the issues of our day-the environment, the economy, foreign policy, global health, and sustainability-not as separate concerns, but as a deeply interconnected whole. In 2007, Watt-Cloutier was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy work in showing the impact global climate change has on human rights, especially in the Arctic, where it is felt more immediately and more dramatically than anywhere else in the world.

In addition to her Nobel nomination, Watt-Cloutier has been awarded the Aboriginal Achievement Award, the UN Champion of the Earth Award, and the prestigious Norwegian Sophie Prize. She is also an officer of the Order of Canada. From 1995 to 2002, she served as the elected Canadian president of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). In 2002, she was elected international chair of the council. Under her leadership, the world's first international legal action on climate change was launched with a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.